Tag Archives: eco friendly

Cordwood Tree of Life

“If you build it, they will come” rings true even with cordwood.  It is said that when one builds with cordwood, help arrives in interesting and unusual ways. This story is no exception. Stuart, a man of many talents (and obviously cordwood is one of them), selected a crew of beautiful cordwood apprentices. stu-bridge-mn-shed-9Stu wanted to save and remember a beloved cherry tree that came down in his yard.  What better way than to place it gently in the cordwood wall.stu-bridge-mn-shed-2Here is Stu, the man with the cordwood plan.  stu-bridge-mn-shed-3Here are the lovely ladies that worked on Stu’s project.  They helped create the beautiful shed and its wonderful motifs with verve and panache.

To create “The Tree of Life”  Stu first laid out the bottles in his basement on a cold winter’s night. stu-bridge-mn-shed-6He transferred the design to heavy cardboard and then built it, bottle by bottle and piece by piece into the side of the Tree of Life Shed. stu-bridge-mn-shed-7Here is the tree mortared in the wall.  When the sun hits the outside the inside lights up like a Christmas Tree. stu-bridge-mn-shed-8What a beautiful way to honor the tree that had to be removed from his yard. stu-bridge-mn-shed-9Here is what it looks like all “prettied up” with trim, doors and paint. Nice job Stu!stu-bridge-finished-shedStuart has opened a Bed and Breakfast at his home in White Bear Lake,  Minnesota.  He is a wonderful host and very knowledgeable about many, many things.  If you want to stay at a clean, comfortable home, see some beautiful cordwood and his Tree of Life Shed, give him a holler.  https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/14283781?s=dsDND2I6

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Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

 

Cordwood Warming Shelter

We built a cordwood warming hut at the Merrill School Forest that gradually morphed into a public school classroom along the way. The goal was to create a natural building using materials from the surrounding woods for students to warm up in on their winter hikes.
The result is a state code-approved, public school classroom that boldly demonstrates “best practice building” using sustainable methods.  Many of  these techniques can be used with other alternative building methods like strawbale, cob, earthen plaster, adobe and cobwood. Cordwood Education Center Richard Flatau highresjpeg with logo

The building started with architectural drawings and blueprints. These were sent to the state capitol in Madison, Wisconsin to be assessed for code compliance  We were pleased when they were approved. [Note:  In the future this tiny cabin may become a care-takers cottage and so “knock outs” were made during construction to provide for plumbing for a kitchen and a bathroom.]

The wood for the entire building (posts, cordwood, window boxes, paneling, trim) was cut within 1000 feet of the building site.  We used tamarack (larch), pine, spruce and balsam. Crews of community volunteers from ages 4 to 80 turned out to help. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A Wood Mizer cut all the posts, beams and one inch lumber. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

For planning, we started with an architectural drawing.

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A rubble trench is much messier in reality.  This poor soil is called “goose nuggets.” sfwh5

A 4″ perforated drain tile surrounds the foundation and carries the water away. sfwh12

In order to satisfy code requirements, we topped it with a Frost Protected Shallow Foundation (FPSF).  Five million of these foundations have been built in Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland and they are now approved in the USA and Canada.  They work very well in cold climates, keeping the heat in the building and most are outfitted with radiant-in-floor heating systems.  This type of foundation saves money by reducing materials and excavation costs.

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The building was framed using heavy timbers of pine and tamarack (larch).  The roof truss was built with a 14″ Energy Heel so that  starched cellulose could be packed to the outside edge of the top plate, giving the roof an R-value of 53.

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The high school construction classes and middle school students came to work and learn.  They wanted to live and work here all semester.

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Everybody pitched in.  We had 90 volunteers and 180 folks who came to “have a look/see.”  So, doing the math,  for every one who worked, two supervised :0)

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The split faced blocks are needed in this area because of the high snow depth (70″ per year) to protect the cordwood.  The double posts allow for a 16″ wall, which not only provides an excellent thermal mass, but also an R-value of 24.

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The sawdust mixed with lime provides a thermal break.

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As the walls began to rise, the community came together to help.

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Building the Big Dipper wall with seventeen volunteers.

Below, ready for the windows and doors as Autumn approaches.

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The cup end of the dipper points to the North Star.  “Follow the drinking gourd” was what Harriet Tubman sang to her escaping comrades.

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The dedication was planned and celebrations took place.  The Cordwood Education Center is now used every day by the students of the Merrill Area Public Schools. It is also used as a Warming Shelter by weekend skiers and hikers.

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The students celebrate!

Watch a brief video about beavers at the Cordwood Education Center .  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh6uW663R88

Even the media found this little classroom in the woods appealing.

The local and national media payed close attention to the project.  Many other cabins, homes and cottages have been built using the Cordwood Education template.

Cordwood has a tremendous amount of “thermal mass” which means it has the capability of taking and holding and then releasing the warmth or coolness that has been introduced by passive or active means.   In other words your warm building will stay warm and if you cool it, it will stay cool:0)

Ready to welcome the students!cordwood-education-center-with-summer-small-pixels-for-new-pioneer-sample

We host an annual Solar Tour of Homes and Businesses. solar-tour-cordwood-education-center-2015-with-logo

Best Practices used in this building.

  • Rubble Trench
  • FPSF  (Frost Protected Shallow Foundation)
  • Natural materials built up (off grade)
  • 16″ cordwood walls (R-24)
  • Post & Beam Framework
  • Energy Heel Truss
  • Large Overhangs (2′ and 6′)
  • Gutters to prevent splashback
  • Metal Roof (to shed extreme snow load)
  • Energy Efficient Windows and doors
  • Passive Solar Design
  • Natural materials sustainably and locally harvested (posts/sawdust/cordwood/lumber)
  • Random patterning of well dried softwood
  • 200 recycled bottles/stones/momentos placed in the walls from the volunteers

Let’s be clear. Not everyone has to use all these best practices.  They are simply listed for the owner/builders consideration.  The choices you make will be based upon your time, talents and treasure.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.

If you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixels

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

“Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.”  www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVD label cover yellow

Here is a jpeg of the new Cordwood Construction DVD cover available at http://cordwoodconstruction.org/

Tiny Cordwood Cabin in Colorado

Peter Debenham and Ann Linquist built a lovely tiny cordwood cabin in Colorado. Their original practice building was a wood shed, but this is going to be a multi-use cabin. They are 10 miles from Estes Park in Drake, Colorado.  peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-5This is a 15′ x 8′ post and beam tiny home, cabin, shelter, shop, studio, etc.  120 sq. ft. with 10 inch cordwood infill. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-1The generous use of bottles has made it even more attractive (just like the handsome couple).  The bottles are colored both inside and out (not clear on the outside). peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-2The wood is “pine beetle killed” lodgepole pine.  If you’ve been to the west you will see this is a great use of an insect destroyed resource. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-6The Tiny Cottage nestles nicely into the mountains, forest and streams.  It is what I feel Frank Lloyd Wright would call Organic Architecture. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-3Ann proudly displays her tuckpointing skills. Notice (again) that the bottle bricks are colored on both sides. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-8Peter stands on top of the outstanding framework happily enjoying the sturdiness and a refreshing breeze. . peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-7Under construction.  Note the well placed log ends, the clean mortar joints and the colored bottles.  The roof is a living roof. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-4The Grade Beam is such a good way to save on material cost (both excavation and concrete).  A Rubble Trench can be used if you are worried about heaving, but this is mostly a sandy subsoil.

Here is the wood shed and “come along” that started it all.peter-debenham-3peter-debenham-2peter-debenham-1

This is the practice building that endowed Peter and Ann with manifest confidence to tackle the Tiny Cordwood Cabin.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

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Here is a picture of the DVD label on the best selling Cordwood Construction video.  It has been getting rave reviews for its incredible detail, clear instruction and how it breaks the cordwood tasks into manageable sections.  There are 30 menu items from foundation, framing, electrical, plumbing, wall building, materials, special effects, bottle bricks, best practices, drone views of outstanding cordwood and so much more. Order yours today.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

 

Cordwood B & B in the Adirondacks

Rarilee & James Conway built this beautiful airbnb cordwood Bed and Breakfast in the Adirondacks of upstate New York near Whiteface Mountain.  Rarilee used the Stoneview style project as a way to provide extra income for the family and involve them in a meaningful project.airbnb-rarilee-conway-adirondacks-cordwood-1 Rairlee says: “We built this unique cabin by hand using locally sourced eco-friendly materials. 22′ diameter octagon w/ 8′ x 8′ bathroom (tiled shower & compost toilet). Timber frame structure, cordwood walls & living roof. Bottle logs add color & creativity. Full kitchen, charcoal grill & fire pit. Linens provided. Comfortably sleeps up to 3 w/ queen memory foam mattress & single futon. Shed is available for ski/bike storage. Easy, close access to ski, fish, hike & bike. You can hear wolves howl too!”rairlee-and-james-frame-it-first-4-copyInside it’s cozy, warm and relaxing. rairlee-and-james-frame-it-first-5-copyOne of the reviews from someone who stayed at the cottage.  “The Adirondack Cordwood Cabin is a little slice of hand-crafted, charming, mountain paradise. The cordwood construction with colored glass highlights and gorgeous exposed beam ceiling make this space feel magical and timeless. One may be struck by the thought of being in some Tolkien world as they gaze out at deer nosing at the ground amongst the pines all around and feel at peace in this little hobbit abode. There’s also all the modern comforts one could want for a perfect couples getaway. Gas woodstove, which keeps the place nice and cozy, superbly comfortable bed, well appointed kitchen suitable for any meal preparation one could imagine, reliable wi-fi, composting toilet (super cool), stereo, and lots of serenity. The wildlife refuge across the street is a really nice perk, and the cabin is situated well within driving distance of the high peaks and lake placid. Will likely be visiting again.”rairlee-and-james-frame-it-firstThe framework is post and beam with a center bearing post. rairlee-and-james-frame-it-first-3-copy

It’s also beautiful and attractive during the summer months.

Want to stay?  

Contact Information:   Rarilee Conway   Email: conway12@charter.net

Web Site: https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/4872916

Phone Number: 518-524-0493    Address: PO Box 57, Wilmington, NY 12997

Rarilee also wrote a wonderful article in the Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 about her project and provides a detailed materials list in her essay Adirondack Cordwood Cabin.  The Papers are available at the Online Cordwood Bookstore. 

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Cordwood Dollhouse

Jim & Barb Collette of Duluth, Minnesota are master glass fusers.  They wanted to build a cordwood sauna, but decided to make a 3D model mock-up for their first grandchild.  When I first saw the results, I said, my daughter would love that!

dollhouse-8Here are Jim’s words on the subject. “The reason I built this house is because in your book you say to build a smaller project first before moving on to building a house. Well I wanted to build a small shed or maybe a sauna in the yard so I thought I would start small. Also we have a grandchild coming soon and I thought it would be nice to build something he/she can play with. I framed it up on a piece of plywood. I then put in the floor which is 3/4” oak flooring cut down to size.

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The walls are only 1 1/4″ thick, if I were to make another of this size I would go with 2″ long “logs” instead to make it stronger. I think the wood was dry enough but I experienced some shrinkage possibly because it was mostly hard wood. The mortar I used was one part sawdust to one part regular bagged mortar mix. The sawdust was maybe too fine and I would use a coarser product next time. The door is made from a piece of 3/4″ flooring and there is a fused glass window in it and a glass beer for a door knob.

dollhouse-4dollhouse-5dollhouse-6 The other windows in the house are all fused glass windows. My wife made the windows for the house. After completing the house I masked everything off and put 4 coats of shellac on it all inside and out. The floor inside has 5 coats of poly on it. Looking forward to constructing a larger project outside, maybe a sauna.”
Jim and Barb Collette

dollhouse-3

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

 

Tiny Cordwood home in Nova Scotia

Michael Fuller is in the process of building a tiny cordwood home in Nova Scotia, Canada.  He has incorporated delightful twists and turns to make his design elegant and intriguing.

michael-fuller-nova-scotia-flying-art-cordwood-cabinThe large gable end overhangs add protection from the prevailing wind and rain.michael-fuller-west_wall_with_stack-nova-scotiaThe stone foundation provides protection from snow, rain and moisture.michael-fuller-flying-art-stackwall_front

The “swoosh” in the walls gives the feeling of a wave cresting and rolling into shore.

michael-fuller-flyingartseasidehighspeed-com-nova-scotia-small-pixelsThe curved porch post, the hand-made door, the decoratively cut fascia and the attentive canine,  all give a homey feel to this delightful little cottage.  Coming in at less than 500 square feet, it has all the rubrics for an attractive, sturdy tiny home.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Cordwood Sauna: Medicine Wheel & Grade Beam

Dan & Kristen wanted a sauna on their 80 wooded acres in northern Wisconsin.  They had previously hosted a very successful workshop at the 2005 Cordwood Conference which resulted in the construction of a beautiful cordwood maple syrup shed.  novitch-shed-31

They wanted to have their teenage sons participate in the process, they decided on a grade beam  for economy and ease of building.Novitch sauna 2A grade beam is simply a shallow, perimeter poured slab which rests on a rubble trench foundation.  In the trades it is called a Frost Protected Shallow Foundation (FPSF) and is insulated on the bottom and sides. Novitch sauna 1The posts are anchored to the grade beam using angle iron and wedge anchors or anchor bolts.   All the posts were cut at a local sawmill. Novitch 19It is important to cross brace the framework.  The roof was built before the cordwood infill commenced. Novitch workshop 18Before the workshop portions of the walls built with the family for practice. Novitch workshop 20

On the top right hand side an “exploded log” has been split and then placed in the mortar matrix to regain its round shape.  This is done to eliminate log shrinkage. Novitch workshop 21We had an August workshop with a delightful and studious group of cordwooders from all over the country.  Novitch workshop 23A cardboard template for bottle end designs works very well.Novitch workshop 24The finished Ojibwe-inspired Medicine Wheel. novitch-shed-31

The Novitch’s are very happy with their new sauna!novitch-cordwood-finished-1-with-logonovitch-cordwood-finished-2-jpg-with-logoA butterfly checks it out!novitch-cordwood-finished-3-with-logonovitch-cordwood-finished-4-with-logonovitch-cordwood-finished-5-with-logoExploded large pieces look very good in a wall. novitch-cordwood-finished-6-with-logonovitch-cordwood-finished-7-jpg-with-logonovitch-cordwood-finished-8-with-logo

Cordwood Lessons by Dan Novitch

Cordwood Points gleaned from two cordwood projects: a cordwood pole shed built on a ladder pad foundation and a post-and-beam framed cordwood sauna built on a grade beam/ring beam foundation) completed 11 years apart:

* Tuck pointing – we used table knives to tuck point the mortar on our first building and tea spoons followed by a wet paint brush on the second building.  The spoon, brush technique was quicker and resulted in a smoother finish.

* First building used treated lumber for the frame of the ladder pad and the poles.  Second building used posts and beams from trees cut on site and milled on site with portable bandsaw mill.  Use as much site sourced or locally sourced building material as possible.

*. Both buildings used coarse sawdust for insulation and when soaked, as a set retardant in the mortar.  Really liked this due to low cost, local material, and completely “green” building material.  Plus, any leftover sawdust is great for composting or as mulch.

* Ladder pad foundation from first building is on a well drained, sandy soil site.  After 11 years and 11 Wisconsin winters, the building has NOT moved a bit.  I wouldn’t hesitate to use similar foundation in the future for a shed or similar out building.

* The second building is on a grade beam foundation.  I was originally going to build it on a floating slab until a grade beam foundation was suggested.  I think the grade beam is definitely the way to go.  In addition to greatly reducing the amount of and cost for concrete, it allows for a plethora of really cool flooring options.

* First building was built when our sons were 5 and 3 years old.  For the second building they were 16 and 14.  Besides being a great help as laborers and mortar mixers, they learned how to run a sawmill, do post and beam construction methods, use cordwood masonry skills, etc.  In the future, if they choose, their parents could be laborers for their own cordwood building dream.

*  For anything but a very small project, use a mortar mixer or modified cement mixer.  It will speed the project and reduce physical fatigue.  Definitely,  mix your first batches of mortar in a wheelbarrow or mortar boat, though.  That is the best way to truly get to know and understand the mortar.

*  For the first project all log ends over 6-7 inches in diameter were split and air dried for 15 months before building began.  However, in looking at other cordwood buildings over the intervening 11 years, I found that I liked the look of at least  a few large, true rounds in each wall.  So for the second project, we used both “exploded” rounds and kiln dried true rounds in each wall along with smaller diameter rounds and various split log ends.  At three months post cordwooding, the exploded rounds haven’t changed or moved a bit.  For the largest kiln dried true rounds, some 12-16 inches in diameter, there is a 2-3mm gap between the mortar and the log ends due to further shrinkage/drying of these really large rounds with time.  I still like the look of the larger rounds but it looks like permachink will be needed in the future.  The kiln dried rounds up to 8-10″ diameter have not shrunk to this point, but I’ll keep my eye on them over the coming months and cold, dry winter.

*  Bottle end designs are really cool.

*  My wife is not only a wonderful, beautiful partner in this voyage known as life, she is a patient, forgiving building partner who knows all my shortcomings, but loves me anyway.

*  The 94# bags of Portland cement weigh more now than they did 11 years ago!

A cardboard template for bottle end designs work very well.
*  We used different mortar mixes for each building.  I liked the second building’s mix a bit better, but both worked fine.  If you plan to do a small “learning” cordwood building before undertaking a larger house or cabin project, consider trying different mortar mixes on different walls of the learner project to see which type of mortar you like best.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

 

Cordwood Cabin (with 24″ thick walls) is energy efficient & fortress-like (revisited)

Editor’s Note:  This post has consistently been among the Top 5 most popular (on my site) and I have added new photos and new details to the original.  

Adam & Erica Konopka and their children, started building a Cordwood Cabin near the shores of Lake Michigan this past summer.
The cabin has 24″ thick walls with foam insulation in the center cavity.Adam 8 big strong cordwood menA cordwood cabin requires a lot of cordwood log ends and big, strong men!Adam 910The clean up of the yard required a pink dress,  green mud boots and a hair ribbon.  How sweet!  This reminds me of my daughter Katy cleaning up our cordwood site 30+ years ago in her red gingham dress.

Here is some detailed information about the "build" from Adam. "The design concept for the cabin is relatively straightforward – approximately 1,000 square feet (26x40), post and beam frame, built into an 8 foot sloped hillside (basically a half basement of concrete walls), single gable with 6/12 pitch, partial loft, and cordwood infill.  The cabin is located in Michigan, between Ludington and Manistee."  

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There is an earth berm on the north wall that allows for moderating of temperature.

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Spraying the foam into the center cavity became a family affair.

Adam 6A 24″ inch thick wall makes for deep window boxes.  Not only will this cabin be safe and warm, it will be like “a fortress for well being.”  Quote from Adam “Thermal Mass is where it’s at.”Adam 15

Adam 14Cleaning up around the log ends is a task that requires patience and the right tools.Adam 1

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"I have begin to reflect on the process and have a variety of appreciations and a few concerns with how it went for us.  1)  Thermal mass is where its at.  It doesn’t get enough credit.  Our cabin is basically half earth sheltered and has cordwood walls for most of the remaining exterior.  We could feel the interior get cooler as the walls went up.  Amazing!  We are planning on using the cabin in the summers and are optimistic that our building design and two foot cordwood walls will keep us cool during those hot summer months. 2) Loved the foam. We used froth pac insulation kits that we special ordered through Lowes.  Originally, we were planning on using the spray foam for the first few feet of our walls and then switch to sawdust - we decided not to put in a knee-wall and were concerned about moisture.  But we fell in love with the foam: user friendly, contributes to wall stability, superior R-value, and not susceptible to rot and bugs - and decided to use it throughout our cordwood walls.  The major drawback remains cost - we spent approximately $5,000 on it.  Brutal, but we still feel like it is worth it. 3) Rod Cox:  We have had a great experience working with him and would highly recommend him to others.  He understood our design concept, enhanced it, and made it be more cost effective.  The drawings were detailed and exceeded the standards of most of the people who worked with them." Adam and Erica 14) Building Design: Our cabin is basically a hybrid between a traditional post-and-beam and modern construction techniques.  We started out pursuing a timber frame structure, but were limited by our time frame and budget...    5) Cordwood is time-intensive:  We wrapped our post-and-beam structure and veneered (with approximately 8 inch cordwood) our concrete walls.  While the work was generally easy and enjoyable - it took a long time.  Going into the summer, I planned a month of labor for cordwood and it took a month and half.  It would have taken longer if we had not been rescued by family and friends.  We would not have gotten it enclosed (our minimum summer goal) without them.  It took us longer because we had additional cuts needed to wrap our post-and-beam structure. adam-13-with-logoeric-beth-12-jpg-kopanka-cabin-floor-plan

The way we hung our windows added labor time too.  We locally sourced true 2×8 white pine and constructed our window frames.  We think they turned out beautifully and, given the two foot width of our walls, will make a distinctive contribution to our living space.  We hung the window frames before we started laying cordwood due to 1) labor availability (we wanted to maximize my brother's help) and 2) installation efficiency (easier to align).  The trade off, however, was additional time needed for wall construction - we had to make extra cuts.  I would do it differently next time and would advise others likewise.  6) Red pine: We sourced our red pine from the Manistee National Forest through a hunters/firewood program.  Free!  The forest services over-planted red pine in the area back in the 1930s and 40s.  We are really glad to find a use for some, even if it is only a small amount.  We were able to get the moisture content down to 14-16.  We dunked each log in Borax, sprayed much of the logs with Shell-guard, and stained the ends.  Generally happy with it.  We left approximately 80% of the logs round and split 20%.   I am concerned about bugs - we are in an old growth forest and, over the summer, we is covered the most amazing bug life in the woods.  Freaky too.  I am anticipating maintenance down the road for our red pine and am hoping for the best. 7) Mortar cracks: We had small cracks around most of our window frames. How do you avoid that?  The wood was kiln dried and we used keyways, protruding drywall screws, and even applied sealer.  I thought we might do better.  My impression is that it is probably par for the course and nothing Permachink can't help.  Minimal cracking so far on our logs (dozen or so), even given that some of them are large and left round.  So far, we are doing better that I thought we might with them."  

Adam 4Thank you Adam & Erica for sharing your wonderful  journey.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Cordwood (you see) can be Mortgage Free!

mortgage-free-landscape-photoNew Pioneer Magazine published a four page article on DIY Cordwood Cottages.  The editor allowed me to place the article in various social media sites to encourage the idea of natural building.   The article details the building of cordwood cottages, cabins, classrooms and homes.

new-pioneer-page-1The second page talks about how we built our mortgage free cordwood home.new-pioneer-page-2

The next page details the advantages of being mortgage free.  new-pioneer-page-3

The last page shows a cordwood sauna and a cordwood garden shed built after attending one of our two-day cordwood workshops.  new-pioneer-page-34jpg

This article is reproduced with permission from New Pioneer magazine (www.newpioneermag.com).  If you wish to find out more about Cordwood Construction visit www.corwdoodconstruction.org and read a few of the many instructional articles about many unique and interesting cordwood buildings.

The article is available online in a larger print format at:   http://www.cordwoodconstruction.org/img/Newpioneerarticlewinter2014 or you can press Ctrl and + to increase the size of the text.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.

If you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixels

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

“Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.”  www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVD label cover yellow

Here is a jpeg of the new Cordwood Construction DVD cover available at http://cordwoodconstruction.org/

Moveable Cordwood Cabin

Usually a cordwood cabin’s mortar is prone to cracking if it is moved.  Ernie Burgener has figured out a method of moving a small cordwood cabin (for short distances). He has devised a set of sturdy skids on which he built the frame.  Then he has applied “stay in cross bracing” into the actual walls to stabilize them for an eventual change of scenery.  ernie-burgner-14-new

This 10′ x 12′ cordwood cabin has been lovingly built out of cedar this past summer.  ernie-burgner-10-new

Ernie is a northern Wisconsin horizontal log cabin builder and knows a thing or two about how to make a cabin warm, sturdy and safe.

ernie-burgener-12-new

Ernie is going to sell this cabin, so if you are interested please send me an email  richardflatau@gmail.com 

ernie-burgner-2Ernie farms, logs, hunts, fishes, builds and gardens.  He is 80 years old and still going strong.  ernie-burgner-4

The inside shows how the bracing extends all the way through.

The viewer can see from the inside and out that the cabin is well braced.   Since it hasn’t been moved yet, we are not sure how it will hold up.  When that happens I will report back to the Cordwood Construction Blog page.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.

If you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixels

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

“Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.”  www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVD label cover yellow

Here is a jpeg of the new Cordwood Construction DVD cover available at http://cordwoodconstruction.org/