Tag Archives: cordwood shed plans

Cordwood Tree of Life

“If you build it, they will come” rings true even with cordwood.  It is said that when one builds with cordwood, help arrives in interesting and unusual ways. This story is no exception. Stuart, a man of many talents (and obviously cordwood is one of them), selected a crew of beautiful cordwood apprentices. stu-bridge-mn-shed-9Stu wanted to save and remember a beloved cherry tree that came down in his yard.  What better way than to place it gently in the cordwood wall.stu-bridge-mn-shed-2Here is Stu, the man with the cordwood plan.  stu-bridge-mn-shed-3Here are the lovely ladies that worked on Stu’s project.  They helped create the beautiful shed and its wonderful motifs with verve and panache.

To create “The Tree of Life”  Stu first laid out the bottles in his basement on a cold winter’s night. stu-bridge-mn-shed-6He transferred the design to heavy cardboard and then built it, bottle by bottle and piece by piece into the side of the Tree of Life Shed. stu-bridge-mn-shed-7Here is the tree mortared in the wall.  When the sun hits the outside the inside lights up like a Christmas Tree. stu-bridge-mn-shed-8What a beautiful way to honor the tree that had to be removed from his yard. stu-bridge-mn-shed-9Here is what it looks like all “prettied up” with trim, doors and paint. Nice job Stu!stu-bridge-finished-shedStuart has opened a Bed and Breakfast at his home in White Bear Lake,  Minnesota.  He is a wonderful host and very knowledgeable about many, many things.  If you want to stay at a clean, comfortable home, see some beautiful cordwood and his Tree of Life Shed, give him a holler.  https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/14283781?s=dsDND2I6

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Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

 

Tiny Cordwood Cabin in Colorado

Peter Debenham and Ann Linquist built a lovely tiny cordwood cabin in Colorado. Their original practice building was a wood shed, but this is going to be a multi-use cabin. They are 10 miles from Estes Park in Drake, Colorado.  peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-5This is a 15′ x 8′ post and beam tiny home, cabin, shelter, shop, studio, etc.  120 sq. ft. with 10 inch cordwood infill. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-1The generous use of bottles has made it even more attractive (just like the handsome couple).  The bottles are colored both inside and out (not clear on the outside). peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-2The wood is “pine beetle killed” lodgepole pine.  If you’ve been to the west you will see this is a great use of an insect destroyed resource. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-6The Tiny Cottage nestles nicely into the mountains, forest and streams.  It is what I feel Frank Lloyd Wright would call Organic Architecture. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-3Ann proudly displays her tuckpointing skills. Notice (again) that the bottle bricks are colored on both sides. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-8Peter stands on top of the outstanding framework happily enjoying the sturdiness and a refreshing breeze. . peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-7Under construction.  Note the well placed log ends, the clean mortar joints and the colored bottles.  The roof is a living roof. peter-debenham-ann-lundquist-4The Grade Beam is such a good way to save on material cost (both excavation and concrete).  A Rubble Trench can be used if you are worried about heaving, but this is mostly a sandy subsoil.

Here is the wood shed and “come along” that started it all.peter-debenham-3peter-debenham-2peter-debenham-1

This is the practice building that endowed Peter and Ann with manifest confidence to tackle the Tiny Cordwood Cabin.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

dvd-label-cover-yellow

Here is a picture of the DVD label on the best selling Cordwood Construction video.  It has been getting rave reviews for its incredible detail, clear instruction and how it breaks the cordwood tasks into manageable sections.  There are 30 menu items from foundation, framing, electrical, plumbing, wall building, materials, special effects, bottle bricks, best practices, drone views of outstanding cordwood and so much more. Order yours today.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

 

Cordwood Shed in Newfoundland, Canada

Paul & Josephine Johnson enjoyed the labor intensiveness of building a Cordwood Ladder Pad Shed in Newfoundland, Canada.The Johnson’s used Richard Flatau’s Cordwood Shed Plans (details at the end of the article) to build the simple, inexpensive framework.  paul-johnson-newfoundland-3Then they mortared the cordwood infill into the wall sections.  On certain areas they used 60 year barn boards for vertical siding.   Below is the article that appeared in the newspaper.paul-johnson-newfoundland-5(From the newspaper article)——————————————–Cordwood masonry appears to be a contradiction in terms   by Randy Edison

“When Paul Johnson first heard of the construction method from a friend it became a curiosity.He was curious enough, in fact, to turn it into a handyman project that, despite the challenges, brought a sense of accomplishment.

paul-johnson-newfoundland-1Cordwood construction consists of placing “log ends” into a wall within a mix of mortar. The method has been used on both sides of the Atlantic for hundreds of years.Johnson, a Grand Falls-resident, studied a little on the subject and decided to try his hand at it his “home away from home” in Rattling Brook, Green Bay.

“You can only use softwood so I cut some and thought, well, if I didn’t want to do it I can burn the wood anyway,” he told TC Media.

cordwood-shed-paul-and-josephine-newfoundlandNote the ladder pad, post framework above. paul-johnson-newfoundland-2The framework breaks the work up into manageable sections.

With admittedly more vigour than knowledge, he set about the task, which included the sinking of posts below the frost line to support to the pole barn structure he envisioned. That design called for seven holes.

Anyone who has worked the ground in Newfoundland knows that, in many areas, digging postholes can be a challenge as rocks abound.

Such is the case in Rattling Brook and before long he realized how labour intensive the task ahead was going to be.And that was before he and his construction partner and spouse, Josephine, actually began the wall construction and learned just how long the job would take.

“(A neighbour) stopped by one day when I was just at the pole barn structure and said, ‘You know Paul, if you had a few sheets of 3/8 plywood you’d be done by now.’”

“I said, ‘That’s right, but this is what we’d kind of like to do.’”

There isn’t an ounce of regret over the physical toiling.

In fact, he’s glad the project got his attention because it ended up “filling a gap” for him while he was unable to work due to a medical issue.

He does wish he’d realized what others had.

“Most people start with a kennel, or at least something small,” he joked.

With his wife’s artistic eye adding to the flare and presentation, the couple worked some bottles into the design for effect and plugged away for five months to complete the project.

While his wife brought the artistic flare, Johnson did have a design vision that came to life.

He wanted to incorporate some rustic looking barn wood and found the right touch – in an old building on the Jigg’s Farm property near Botwood.With permission, he gathered some of the board and worked it into the construction.
Undaunted (but a lot wiser in the ways of cordwood construction) Johnson is even considering another project.One distinct possibility is a gazebo to act as an art studio for his wife.

It’s fitting that he’d want to put that effort into something for his spouse since the Rattling Brook property was an anniversary gift of hers to him.After coming to Canada from England in 1967, Johnson had bounced around the country between Ontario and Nova Scotia and Alberta and, of course, Newfoundland.“I said I’d come for one year and if I didn’t like it, I’m out of here,” he joked.

In fact, he did leave again but decided to come back in 1996 and settled in central Newfoundland.

“I wouldn’t live anywhere else,” he says of his adopted province.

“And it’s been home ever since.”

Cordwood shed and all.”

———————————————————————-The booklet Cordwood Shed Plans is available as an ebook.  It contains 30 pages, chock full of color photos about how to build the inexpensive and functional ladder pad system that provides both framework and support for the cordwood infill, without having to pour a footer. .

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Cordwood Shed Plans is available at the Online Cordwood Bookstore.

 

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org