Tag Archives: natural

Cordwood Yak & Yow Barn in Alaska

Jeffrey H. Dean is a true Renaissance man: a builder, sculptor, painter, metalsmith, potter and jack of all trades/master of all trades.   Here is but one of his many projects:  a gorgeous timber frame barn with cordwood and board & batten.  This serves as home for yaks, yows and goats.  [The following pictures are the copyright of Jeffrey H Dean and are used with his permission.]  jhdean Homer Alaska yak barn 2 with logos.jpgJeffrey and his beautiful wife Ranja are offering Homestead Tours of their gorgeous Homer, Alaska paradise in August and September 2017.   Sign up or take a virtual tour at the following link if you would like to be amazed and/or commission a piece of artwork.  https://jeffreyhdean.com/tour/   jhdean Homer Alaska yak barn 3 homer alaska with logos.jpgNice juxtaposition of cordwood, framing and board & batten siding.jhdean Homer Alaska yak barn 4 homer alaska with logos.jpgNow, wouldn’t you like to be a pampered yak or yow (cow/yak cross) in this building!  jhdean Homer Alaska yak barn 7 homer alaska with logosThe vistas are truly breathtaking. jhdean Homer Alaska yak barn 8 homer alaska with logos.jpgThe hay is sweet and the building so very attractive. jhdean Homer Alaska yak barn 6 homer alaska with logos                              Look at how the doors and the locks all tie into the framework!  This is assuredly a master craftsman at work.  https://jeffreyhdean.com/tour/workshop/cordwood/

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:   Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided instruction for thousands of cordwood builders.  Cordwood Workshop Video (2017),  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (2017) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Here is a picture of the Cordwood Workshop Video cover, featuring the Cordwood Education Center.

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For more information on Cordwood Construction, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   Below is the 30 item Video menu. 

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Cordwood Patio Floor in Slovakia

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Cordwood in New Zealand

Clifton Loveridge of Loveridge Woodcraft sent the following pictures of this beautiful cordwood build in Tokomaru Bay, New Zealand.  Clifton used Macrocarpa log ends 350mm thick (14 inches), posts were Macrocarpa and Manuka wrapped in thick plastic and mortared.Loveridge Woodcraft NZ Tokomaru Bay 2 with logo.jpgBeautiful flooring using stones and large slabs of stone.Loveridge Woodcraft NZ Tokomaru Bay 1 with logo.jpgIt boasts a “Hessian Ceiling”, (which is burlap stapled between the roundwood rafters)  glass wool (fiberglass) insulation and an iron roof.  Clifton states, “I’m keen to build more of these.”   Loveridge Woodcraft NZ Tokomaru Bay 3The cordwood building is 30′ x 20′ (600 square feet). The exterior has a few very large diameter pieces of wood.Loveridge Woodcraft NZ Tokomaru Bay 4A.jpgIt is built right into New Zealand’s  natural landscape.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for thousands of cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Here is a picture of the Cordwood Workshop Video cover, featuring the Cordwood Education Center.

DVD label cover yellow.jpg

For more information on Cordwood Construction, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   Below is the 30 item Video menu. 

DVD Menu 1A 400 pixels

DVD menu 2A 400 pixels.jpg

Cordwood at Kinstone Permaculture Academy

Kinstone Academy of Applied Permaculture rests gently upon a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River.  The largest megalithic stone circle in North America, a walking labyrinth, rolling hills, a tepee, a yurt, a reflecting pond, permaculture plantings and three cordwood buildings accent the landscape.  Kinstone  low rez with logo.jpgThe cordwood chapel is a hexagonal structure with 12′ walls and 16″ cedar infill.  It has 450 bottle bricks embedded in the walls, creating a homage to the natural world. Kinstone cordwood chapel interiorBelow is Brother Sun and the flora and fauna of the grassy plains. The sunrise wall flowers stems dragonfly low rez with logo.jpgMany workshops were held at Kinstone and hundreds of participants placed logs, stones and bottles into the walls. Kinstone snowball testThe sturdy stone foundation is gneiss (nice) stone from central Wisconsin. workshop 37aThe Mississippi River runs through the building (symbolically).  Kinstone walls with logoThere is also a cordwood sauna on site that doubles as a guest cottage.

 

Cordwood workshop sauna 6.jpgIt was also a labor of love with many workshop participants.  Kinstone sauna 1 with logoThe interior feels warm and comforting. Kinstone workshop 2017 4The Dragon’s Den, an entrance center with a living roof, awaits eager visitors.  Kinstone Dragons Keep 1There are many dragons embedded in the walls.  Kinstone Dragons Keep 3A rich kaleidoscope of colors greets the welcomed guest.  Kinstone Dragon 3A                            Mandalas are an integral part of the buildings.  Mandalas offer balancing visual elements, symbolizing unity and harmony.

Kinstone is filled with good energy and good vibrations.  If you are in the Winona, Minnesota area (this is right across the Mississippi River in Fountain City, Wisconsin) it is worth a visit.  There is a self guided map at the Entrance Center to make sure you know where to go.  http://www.kinstonecircle.com/

If you wish to take a cordwood workshop, click on the Kinstone Courses menu.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for thousands of cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Here is a picture of the Cordwood Workshop Video cover, featuring the Cordwood Education Center.

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For more information on Cordwood Construction, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   Below is the 30 item Video menu. 

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Swedish Cordwood Sauna by Pelle

The interior of Pelle Henriksson’s sauna in Sweden is a work of art.   It is very pleasing to the eye, sturdy,  and simultaneously, whimsical (note the blue window).   The large sauna stove screening is filled with rocks meant to produce the sacred steam (the loyly) of the sauna (when splashed with water).

pelle henriksson sauna stoveThe sauna entrance door is also excellent craftsmanship.Pelle Kubbhausta 2.jpgThis is the interior door to enter the sauna.  The hinges and wood joinery are exquisite!pelle henriksson door sauna

The other side of the door.pelle henriksson door sauna2pelle henriksson sauna benchThe sauna bench has two tiers.  The bottom is the cooler one.  The top is for those who want to feel the hot water vapor pour over them and cleanse their bodies and souls. pelle henriksson scoop stickThe water scoop stick is for pouring water on the hot rocks, thereby making the sacred steam of the sauna.  A bit of Loyly history:  “Taking a sauna begins with having a wash (usually a shower), followed by a sit in the steam room, the room being typically warmed to 80–110 °C (176–230 °F). Water is thrown on the hot stones topping the kiuas, a special stove used to warm up the sauna. This produces great amounts of wet steam, known as löyly, increasing the moisture and the heat within the sauna. The word löyly is used for this particular type of steam.”

Want to see how Pelle built his sauna?  This design would be perfect for a Tiny Cabin.   https://cordwoodconstruction.wordpress.com/2016/10/16/cordwood-sauna-in-sweden-part-2/

pelle henriksson door sauna finished 2017 small pixels.jpgShould you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home (in which to build your cordwood floor), please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

 

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for thousands of cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Here is a picture of the Cordwood Workshop Video cover, featuring the Cordwood Education Center.

DVD label cover yellow.jpg

For more information on Cordwood Construction, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   Below is the 30 item Video menu. 

DVD Menu 1A 400 pixels

DVD menu 2A 400 pixels.jpg

Oldest Cordwood in the world?

Did the Pueblo build cordwood houses?  It looks like they did.  Archeological research indicated they used petrified wood and clay.  This is called the Agate House and is located at the Petrified Forest National Park in NE Arizona.Pueblo Cordwood 1 Petrified Forest National Park.jpgThe petrified wood is 200 million years old and the trees grew hundreds of feet tall. They have petrified over time into very colorful agate.

Pueblo Cordwood 4.jpg Petrified Forest National Park Agate House.jpgAncestral Puebloan people used petrified wood for a variety of purposes including tools such as projectile points, knives, and scrapers. Agate House demonstrates another innovative use of petrified wood: as a building material. The eight-room pueblo was built and occupied sometime between 1050 and 1300 in a location near agricultural fields and petrified wood deposits.

Pueblo Cordwood 2 Agate House demonstrates another innovative use of petrified wood a building materialAgate House now stands alone on top of a small hill in Rainbow Forest, but it was likely part of a much larger community. Since its excavation in the 1930s, hundreds of similar petrified wood structure sites have been found in the park. Many date to the same time period (Pueblo II-Pueblo III). Though built using original materials, the 1930s reconstruction is not a completely accurate replication of the original structure. Still it enables us to envision the daily lives of people that called it home.Pueblo Cordwood 3.jpgThe petrified wood is beautiful.  I guess it can be called cordwood even if the wood is 200 million years old :0)   A big thank you to the Klippel’s for finding and photographing this treasure on their way to the Grand Canyon!

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home (in which to build your cordwood floor), please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for thousands of cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Here is a picture of the Cordwood Workshop Video cover, featuring the Cordwood Education Center.

DVD label cover yellow.jpg

For more information on Cordwood Construction, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   Below is the 30 item Video menu. 

DVD Menu 1A 400 pixels

DVD menu 2A 400 pixels.jpg

Cordwood Flooring DIY

Cordwood Flooring         

It’s not just for the walls, anymore…” 

A neighbor of mine, Steve, called one cold January evening and said,  “Richard, come on over and see my cordwood floor!”  Needless to say, we hurried over and were amazed.  Lee's Floor 1 with logo.jpgSteve is a mason by training and a general contractor by profession, so he has a knowledge and skill base that is both deep and wide.   The hard maple (Acer saccharum) slices he used were 100 years old.

During the past year, three creative souls have sent me pictures and descriptions of their experiences with “laying” interior cordwood floors.  There are, of course, commercial cordwood flooring options available, but most cordwood aficionados are looking to save money and come away with a building “statement” that “wows” and is attractive.Sunny Pettiz Lutz Cordwood floor 9.jpgSunny Pettis Lutz from Arizona was the next one to send photos and an explanation of her cordwood floor in Arizona.  While Steve Lee’s flooring was fastened to a wooden sub-floor, Sunny’s was glued to a slab-on-grade.Sunny Pettiz Lutz Cordwood floor 1 with logo.jpgFinally, Miroslav Bentley Kubala of the Czech Republic regaled me with photos of his beautiful cordwood storage garage complete with a cordwood floor. Miroslav Bentley Kubala Prague3.jpg from Pintrest site floor manufacture 3.jpgHerein follows a brief explanation of three cordwood floors with three different applications.

  1. Cordwood Floor: Steve Lee After finishing his remodeling project, Steve puzzled over what to do with the floor. He had many options in his construction skill set.  Since J & J Lee Construction had poured the foundation at our cordwood home in 1979 and assisted in the addition of a dormer in 1992, Steve thought a cordwood floor might look good in their new, open concept “great room.”  Here the idea of a cordwood floor came to fruition.

While listening to the local radio station’s “Swap Shop” program, Sharon heard about the availability of a pick-up truck load of 100 year old hardwood barn beams.  Dry as a bone, leveled on two sides, of varying diameters, these, when sliced would become the mosaic pattern for the floor.  Each eight foot timber was cut to three feet and leveled on the ends.  The log was then placed in a band saw and  braced vertically.  (Before cutting, these logs were checked with a metal detector, so any nails or screws could be removed.)  Like slicing a loaf of bread, the logs were then sawn into  5/8″ pieces.  In addition all the sawdust was saved for eventual use in the tile-grouting mixture.  The great room’s 600 sq. ft. sub floor was leveled and the cordwood slices were arranged to create a pattern. When an orientation was resolved (flat side north and south, rounded edge east and west), the construction adhesive, purchased in one gallon pails, was applied to a small section of the floor with a notched trowel. Steve suggests following the manufacturer’s instructions for applying the glue.  Dealing with only a small portion at a time is important so the adhesive doesn’t “skin over”.  The slices were firmly set and secured to the floor and the adhesive was allowed to dry for at least 24 hours.  The next step was packing grout in the spaces between the log end slices.  Steve used commercial tile grout mixed with the sawdust he had collected during the cutting process (the ratio was 80% tile grout to 20% sawdust.

After the grout had dried, an industrial sander was rented and coarse 24 grit sandpaper was used to clean the log faces.  (Steve now suggests sealing the top faces of the cordwood BEFORE grouting, so that the log faces do not become coated with grout.)   Steve sanded until he had a fairly level and smooth surface.  A non-latex, commercial varnish sealer was applied with a lamb’s wool pad to achieve a smooth, level surface.  Steve allowed the varnish sealer to set for 24 hours.  Then he used a scuff pad between coats and reapplied more sealer, until he achieved the surface he wanted.Lees' Floor 2.jpgSteve did the flooring at night and on weekends, but he projects that if someone could work full time on the floor, while allowing ample time for drying of the glue and finish coats, that it could be completed in one to two weeks.   Sharon suggests letting the completed floor set for a week before replacing the furniture.  When the furniture is returned to the room, place pads underneath of legs or pressure points to avoid damage to the final coat.

The floor creates a cozy and beautiful ambiance to the home which is filled with other wonderful examples of repurposing (cabinets, paneling, cedar ceiling, claw foot bathtub, etc.) and is a fine example of using surplus materials in a new way.  These projects show the warmth of wood and the attraction of natural materials. The Lee cordwood floor provides an opportunity for creativity when using recycled wood in the home.  One can only ponder the variations of cordwood flooring that could be produced using different patterning and cutting techniques. Visit our blogsite at www.cordwoodconstruction.wordpress.com/ to learn more about cordwood flooring.

  1. Cordwood Floor: Sunny Pettis Lutz in Arizona    Cordwood flooring by Sunny Pettis Lutz in Cornville, AZ.jpg

   Sunny Pettis Lutz sent some photos of her gorgeous, hand-made cordwood floor.  The following is a detailed list of how she and her husband, Tony, made their floor with legal pickings from the state forest.   “Get a permit to go out to the forest and harvest dead trees. In our area that means Juniper and Pine.  On this floor we are using Shaggy Bark Juniper and Alligator Bark Juniper.” Note that their flooring is on top of a cement slab.   Sunny Pettis Lutz new floor pix 2.jpg  Here are their directions:

  • Cut each piece with a chop saw set at 1 inch.
  • Sort ‘disks’ for clean, useable slices.
  • Remove any loose bark.
  • Sand both sides using a belt sander
  • Prepare concrete surface by sweeping and mopping clean.
  • Begin to layout the disks on the floor getting them as close as possible. Work in 2′ sections.
  • Glue the layout you like using Loctite PL Premium Construction Adhesive.
  • Sand the glued discs, using a belt sander until everything is smooth and level.
  • Use a shop-vac to cleanup all dust and debris.
  • Apply a light coat of polyurethane to the surface of the disks (this is to prevent the grout from adhering to the tops).
  • Grout the spaces with a mix of 80% grout & 20% sawdust.
  • Apply 2-3 coats of polyurethane to finish.  Sunny Pettis Lutz cordwood floor  Floor has 3 coats of oil polyurethane. I'll take pics tomorrow. We are VERY happy with this floor with logo.jpg
  1. Cordwood Floor: Miroslav Bentley Kubala of the Czech Republic installed his cordwood flooring on a concrete slab using the same basic techniques as Steve Lee (see above).   Miroslav Bentley Kubala near Prague25 no logo.jpg

Here are instructions from Miroslav:

  • Clean the floor.
  • Cut slices of wood (hardwood or a rot resistant softwood) 3/4″ to 1 inch.
  • Seal the top of the slices so they don’t get stained by the grout.
  • Glue the slices to the floor
  • Fill the gaps with grout
  • Miro used a mortar/bentonite/acryl mixture
  • Seal the floor with polyurethane

Miroslav Bentley Kubala near Prague28.jpgAnd now for something completely different … A cordwood floor using reclaimed cypress by Matt Marwick of www.PrecisionFloorcrafters.com out of river recovered heart cypressCordwood Flooring from FB page of Woodworking Ideas precisionfloorcrafters.com end grain cypress.jpgNote: Anyone wishing to try a DIY project like cordwood flooring is encouraged to study all the available literature and hone your skill set on a small “practice project.”  The success of your venture, will be commensurate with the skills you have acquired and the quality of your construction.  There are commercially available cordwood floor systems which can be examined through an internet search. Google “wood block flooring” and “end grain log flooring,” for starters. You’ll find manufacturers, DIY articles and videos.Cordwood countertop by precision floor crafters and Matt Marwick.jpg(Above) Matt Marwick also built this beautiful cordwood countertop.Cordwood countertop BillandVicki Jarratt 3.jpg(Above) Bill Jarratt, an excellent craftsman from Florida, built this bathroom countertop using cedar and epoxy.  Check out his article on how to do this project. https://cordwoodconstruction.wordpress.com/2012/04/15/cordwood-construction-website/      

Plus, for good measure, we have thrown in a cordwood garden pathway!Cordwood garden path.jpgFinally, many folks have seen exterior cordwood garden paths and outdoor cordwood slices laid in the soil.  This is a different animal than interior flooring.  For outdoor cordwood paths, choose a rot resistant wood (like cedar or cypress) and lay the cordwood slices – two inches thick or better – in a soil or sand base. Then tamp the wood pavers in place and smooth and stomp the soil/sand/aggregate, similar to how one would “lay” a brick or stone patio path.

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home (in which to build your cordwood floor), please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for thousands of cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Here is a picture of the Cordwood Workshop Video cover.  DVD label cover yellow.jpg

For more information on Cordwood Construction, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

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Cordwood, Cardboard & Bottle Ends

What do cordwood, cardboard and bottle ends have in common?Kinstone Dragon 3

They all help make an organized, dramatic, visual statement in a cordwood wall. Let’s say you want a rainbow or a peace sign or the big dipper in a cordwood wall. Here’s one way to do it.  First lay out the design on heavy cardboard.  Then cut out the shapes with a scissors, box cutter or exacto knife. Mandala and cardboard 1Use the cardboard template as a tool to place the bottle bricks and log ends in their proper places.

Mandala and cardboard 2Be patient and let the design be your guide to proper orientation.

Mandala and cardboard 3The end result is worth the extra time.

How about a peace sign?Peace sign cordwood with logo.jpg

 

Novitch workshop 1a.jpgAn Ojibwe medicine wheel is a fine addition to this sauna of health & healing. Novitch shed 30The Big Dipper and North Star are happy to oblige. Big Dipper wall #2.jpgWood ceilings, Big Dipper, Encore Wood Stove and some taxidermy.  This gives very attractive woodsy feel to the room. CEC stove and big dipper wall logo.jpg

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construction, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Cordwood “Dragon’s Keep” Welcomes Guests @Kinstone

The Entrance Center at Kinstone Permaculture Academy is called the Dragon’s Keep. Nineteen dragons reside within its walls, including the 15 foot beast undulating along in the wall.   This project has been ongoing and we finally made the big push to finish. Besides all the wonderful folk who put their heart and soul into the beginnings, we had twenty-three intrepid souls, brave the cold rainy spring weather to put on the finishing touches.  [Thank you to Kristine for the delightful pictures.]  Kinstone Dragon 4(Above)The 15 foot dragon has a dark green eye (far left), scales (triangle bottles) and a tiny set of wings (trapezoidal windows).  The Eastern Red Cedar is apparent in the red tinged pieces of cordwood.  The belly is a 4 foot piece of horizontal White Cedar.Kinstone Dragon 3

(Above) The mandala was created two years ago using cardboard for a template (see below). This is the brightest it has ever shined.  I think it likes having the building completed.  The dragon’s belly was previously positioned and placed.

Kinstone workshop 2The mandala was cut out of a large piece of cardboard to enhance accuracy. Kinstone workshop 9

Kinstone Dragon 10The group (above) worked diligently on April 29.   The group (below) feasted off the first groups’ hard work and completed the final rows of cordwood on April 30.  Kinstone Dragon 5A pewter dragon brings out a delightful smile from our Canadian kindergarten teacher,  Erin. Kinstone Dragon 9Dressing in layers is important for staying comfortable outside.  The bandana is useful as a dust mask and neck warmer for 39 windy degrees! Kinstone Dragon 13Having a heated classroom to eat and discuss Best Practices with cordwood was wonderful and comfortable. Kinstone Dragon 11We have an 8″ fence wall that we are laying out for a motif between the living roof post and beam framework.   It provided fun instruction in a group setting.  Everybody learned by eyeballing each other’s work!

Kinstone Dragon 7

Normally we use 16 inch cordwood in order to achieve an R-value of 24, but on the fence/wall we are using 8″ cordwood and insulating it to give workshop participants a visual reminder to build a thermal break for their home building, all the while using best practices.  M-I-M stands for mortar-insulation-mortar.  Kinstone Dragon 6

A fine row of cordwood and bundled up cordwooders!

Kinstone Dragon 8

Two of our participants from Rhinelander, Wisconsin (Kerry and Cecelia) placed the mythical Hodag into the wall using glass beads.Kinstone Dragon 14As luck would have it, two baby goats were born during the Sunday workshop. Named Peanut and Butter.  Everyone got a chance to cuddle the new borns.  They are very, very sweet animals.

Kinstone Dragon 19.jpgKinstone Dragon 16

Becky and Christy are smitten by the baby goat (Peanut).

Kinstone Dragon 17

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construction, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org

Cordwood in Brazil

Jair Dias sent the following pictures and explanation of the cordwood (cobwood) home he is building in Brazil:    “Jair Dias lives in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil .”

Jair Dias Brazil cob mortar 6A with logo

The wood he is using for the cordwood infill is  Pinus Elliottii   The cob mortar is a mixture of red soil (sifted) and combined with clay, sand, sawdust, cement and lime. He says it works very well.  The bottle bricks in a circular pattern are very colorful. Jair Dias Brazil cob mortar 9 with logo

Note the metal roof, the large overhangs and the wrap around porch.   These help to keep the rain off the cobwood walls and stop any degradation.  Jair Dias Brazil cob mortar 8 with logoJair Dias Brazil cob mortar 7 with logoJair is making an outline (in relief) in the mortar so the wood stands away from the mortar. That makes it easy to clean and sand.   I believe Jair means he is tuckpointing the log 3/4″ back from the end of the log.  This will allow for a final coat of cob for the wall.

Jair Dias 19Jair Dias 18Jair Dias Brazil cob mortar 6 with logo

The bottle bricks are very attractive. Jair Dias Brazil cob mortar 4 with logo

The center does not require a “center post” but rather a cap that helps maintain the integrity of the roof rafters. Jair Dias Brazil cob mortar 3 with logo

The walls are 12″ thick.  Jair Dias 17Jair Dias 16

Lots of windows and entranceways to make the jungle readily available for viewing. I will post more as Jair sends more information.   For pictures of the finished home click on https://cordwoodconstruction.wordpress.com/2017/05/08/cordwood-in-brazil-2/

Should you wish to learn how to build a cordwood cottage, cabin or home, please visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org   While you are there, click on the pictures, read the brief articles, check out the latest workshops and newsletter and if you are interested click on the Online Bookstore to see all the cordwood literature available in print and ebook format.Cordwood Construction Best Practices Front_Cover_-_CC_Best_Practices small pixelsIf you have questions that aren’t answered on the website you can email me at richardflatau@gmail.com  

Readers have requested a brief bio, so here goes:

Richard & Becky Flatau built their mortgage-free cordwood home in 1979 in Merrill, Wisconsin. Since then, they have written books, conducted workshops, facilitated the 2005,  2011 and 2015 Cordwood Conferences and provided consultation for cordwood builders.  Cordwood Construction: Best Practices DVD,  Cordwood Construction Best Practices (print) and Cordwood Conference Papers 2015 are the newest publications available from their online cordwood bookstore.   www.cordwoodconstruction.org

DVDandPrint

Here is a picture of the print version and the DVD label in one composite.

For more information on Cordwood Construciton, click on the picture or visit www.cordwoodconstruction.org